This week we have an animation challenge to get stuck into, using classic stop motion technique. 

We’re drawing inspiration from ‘Little People, Big World’ photography. Take a look at some of the examples below…

Can you create any of your own scenes? 

For more examples of ‘Little People, Big World’ set ups, take a look here.

 

How to Stage Your Own:

You’ll need…

  • Some tiny action figures. These can be tiny dolls, like in the images above, or you can use Lego characters, small animal figures or other toys that can work in the same way
  • Props to create your settings. Lego features can work brilliantly, or you can use craft materials to make your own. 
  • A camera to produce your animation 

Stop Motion Technique

Stop motion animation presents a series of still photographs so quickly, that they appear to move. 

You can produce your animation the ‘old fashioned way’, by taking lots and lots of photos and then editing them together. You can also use an app such as Stop Motion Studio to produce the sequence for you. 

You’ll need lots of individual images to create a sequence. The standard rate of animation is 24 frames (images) per second of video, so for a 10 second animation, you’ll need around 240 images. The best animations present very smoothly, with tiny, almost invisible movements between each frame. 

 

Top Tips: 

  • Try to give your animation a story… What happens to your characters in their scene? Try to keep it simple, you just need a beginning, a middle and an end
  • We suggest practising your character movements first. Try very gradual movements between each image to help the animation flow. 
  • Make sure to keep your camera in a static position. If your camera position moves even slightly, it can be jarring for the audience, so try to keep it perfectly still. 
  • Edit your animation afterwards to include voiceovers, music and any effects you’d like to include.

 

Share Your Animations

We’d love to see your work. If you share it online (with parents’ permission), you can use the hashtag #SparksMovieMaking and we’ll be able to find it. 

 

Good Luck! 

 

 

Interested in more filmmaking ideas? Take a look at some of our recent filmmaking projects here…

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